Minimum Gain Chargeback Provisions

If you have reviewed partnership agreements or operating agreements for an LLC you have probably read provisions relating to Minimum Gain Chargeback.  That being said, the Minimum Gain Chargeback provisions may have put you to sleep, and may not even be practical based upon the facts and circumstances of the partnership.  However, Minimum Gain Chargeback provisions are important to understand if in fact they were to apply to your situation and circumstances.  The article below has been prepared by a tax attorney and business attorney from The McGuire Law Firm to provide an explanation of Minimum Gain Chargeback.

Minimum Gain Chargeback provisions deal with non-recourse debt and the allocations of non-recourse debt.  Such provisions are mandatory if the partnership wishes to allocate non-recourse deductions to the partners in any manner other than per the member’s pro-rata portion of capital interest in the partnership.  Therefore, it is important to identify when a Minimum Gain may be realized.  Minimum Gain occurs when deductions are claimed on property that decrease the partnership’s book basis in the property below the actual balance of the non-recourse debt on the property.  A situation whereby you may see Minimum Gain is when property is depreciated.  The depreciation will drive the partnership’s book basis of the property below the amount of the loan on the property.  When a partnership does have Minimum Gain, the Minimum Gain Chargeback is an allocation of the gain to the partners or members who have received the benefit of non-recourse deductions, or who may have received distributions from the partnership that can be attributed to the non-recourse loan.   In short, if a partner has received a benefit from the depreciation of property whereby they did not bear the economic risk of the loan to acquire the property (because the debt was non-recourse and not personally guaranteed), the benefit can be “charged back” to the partner.

So when does the “charge back” occur?  The deductions or distributions taken by the partners are charged back when the property that was subject to the non-recourse debt is sold, transferred or otherwise disposed of, or when there is a change in the character of the non-recourse debt.  A change in the character of the non-recourse debt could be the debt converted to a recourse liability or the debt being forgiven.

Now, the million dollar question: What is the amount of the charge back?  The partnership’s minimum gain is generally going to be the excess of the non-recourse liabilities over the adjusted tax basis of the property subject to or securing the non-recourse debt.  Perhaps an example will help illustrate this.   Assume J&J, LLC had purchased property for $200,000 and took $100,000 in depreciation on such property.  Thereafter, J&J LLC obtain non-recourse financing of $250,000.  The minimum gain would be $150,000, which is the non-recourse debt of $250,000 less the adjusted basis of $100,000.

It is important to remember that a partner is not subject to a charge back for monies they contribute to repay a non-recourse debt, and it is possible for the partnership to request a waiver of the chargeback under certain circumstances.

John McGuire is a tax attorney at The McGuire Law Firm whose practice focuses primarily on tax matters before the IRS, business transactions and tax issues as they apply to his individual and business clients.  In addition to his law degree, John holds an advanced degree in taxation (LL.M.).  Please feel free to contact John with any questions.

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Tax Matters Related to the Transfer of Property Through Divorce

When property is transferred because of a divorce, is the transfer of property taxable and what tax issues should be considered?  This is a common question when an individual is going through a divorce and begins to look at and consider the settlement agreement and terms the parties are discussing.  The article and information below has been prepared by a tax attorney to provide general information regarding common tax matters and issues related to a divorce, separation of property and payments made after the divorce may have been finalized.  Please remember to consult your divorce attorney and/or tax attorney to discuss the specific tax implications of your divorce proceedings and related agreements.

Perhaps the key Internal Revenue Code section regarding this matter is Section 1041.  In general, IRC Section 1041 holds that transfers of property from one spouse to another spouse (or a former spouse) is not taxable when the transfer of property is incident and through a divorce.  It is important to note that if through the divorce, the parties agree to sell property to a third party, or the court orders the sale of property to a third party, the transfer or sale would be taxed under the normal tax principals.  This is so because the sale or transfer of the applicable property is not considered to be a sale or disposition subject to the divorce.  The non-taxable transfer of retirement accounts such as 401(k)s and similar profit sharing plans requires a specific court order known as a Qualified Domestic Relations Order, which is often referred to as a QDRO.

What about alimony?  Is alimony taxable?  Yes, alimony payments will be taxable to the spouse that receives the alimony payment and is deductible by the spouse (payor) that is paying the alimony.  It is important for the parties to know that they can also opt out of payments being considered alimony.  The parties must specifically state in the divorce documents and instruments that the payment is not alimony and thus not taxable to the recipient and thus not deductible by the party making the payment.

What about child support payments?  Are child support payments taxable?  No, child support payments should not be taxable to the recipient, nor is the party making the child support payment allowed a tax deduction for making the payment.

For example, Jack and Jill are finalizing their divorce agreement and the agreement holds that Jack will pay to Jill $500 per month in maintenance and $700 per month in child support.  The $500 maintenance payment would be taxable income to Jill and a tax deduction to Jack.  The $750 child support payment would not be taxable to any party, and Jack would not be allowed a deduction.

Thus, in addition to consulting with a divorce attorney or family law attorney, you may wish to consult with a tax attorney regarding the tax implications of your divorce decree and settlement documents.

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