The Denver tax attorneys at Buckingham & McGuire have prepared, submitted and negotiated many successful offer in compromises with the IRS. Call our office to discuss an offer with one of our tax attorneys.

Article on Form 433B by Denver Tax Attorney

What is Form 433B?  How is Form 433B used by the Internal Revenue Service?  These are common questions a business may ask Denver Tax Attorney Denver Tax Lawyer IRS Tax Attorney  their tax attorney or CPA if they owe taxes to the IRS and have been asked to complete Form 433B.  The article below has been drafted by a Denver tax attorney at The McGuire Law Firm to explain and discuss Form 433B.

Form 433B is a collection information statement for businesses used by the Internal Revenue Service when a business owes taxes to the IRS and the IRS is requesting information to determine what the business can or cannot pay to resolve the tax debt.  Form 433B would be used for multi-member LLCs, certain partnership and corporations.

 

Form 433B acquires information about a taxpayer such as:

 

–         Name, address and contact information of the business

–          Owners of the business and ownership interests

–          Business assets including fair market value, amount owed on an asset or leased assets, or business equipment (business assets may include equipment, vehicles, tools, real property)

–          Business income and expenses (generally an income statement can be provided)

–          Business bank accounts- both checking and savings accounts

This information is used by the Internal Revenue Service to determine the businesses collection potential, meaning what the business can pay on a monthly installment agreement to resolve any tax debts.  If a business plans to submit an offer in compromise, then the business would prepare and submit Form 433B OIC.  Businesses, like individuals may be able to settle their tax debts with the Internal Revenue Service through the IRS Offer in Compromise Program.

If a business owes 941 employment taxes, this tax debt may create another issue for the business owners or other individuals involved with the business.  The trust fund portion of the 941 taxes (what is withheld from an employee’s paycheck) can be personally assessed to the willful and responsible parties of the business through the Trust Fund Recovery Penalty.  This tax debt may be assessed to one or more individuals and each party is held jointly and severally liable, meaning the IRS can collect all of the trust fund amount from one individual even if multiple individuals are responsible for the trust fund recovery penalty.

If your business owes taxes to the Internal Revenue Service, it is recommended that you contact a tax attorney or tax professional.  Most will offer a free consultation and could help you resolve the issue with the IRS and potentially save money.  A Denver tax attorney at The McGuire Law Firm can assist you individually or your business in resolving a tax debt with the IRS or another tax matter.

You can contact The McGuire Law Firm at 720-833-7705 or John@jmtaxlaw.com to speak with a Denver tax attorney and schedule your free consultation.

Denver Tax Attorney Video on IRS Offer in Compromise

An offer in compromise is an agreement with the IRS whereby a taxpayer is able to settle their tax debt for less than the full amount of the debt owed.

How is an offer in compromise calculated?  Your offer is calculated based upon your equity in assets and disposable income.

How long does the IRS to make a determination regarding my offer in compromise?  Generally, the IRS will take anywhere from 4-12 months to make the initial determination on your offer.  You also have appeal rights if the offer in compromise unit rejects your offer.

Where do I submit my offer in compromise?  You will initially submit your offer to one of two offer in compromise units, which are in Memphis, TN and Holtsville, NY.

A Denver tax attorney at The McGuire Law Firm can prepare, submit and negotiate an offer in compromise with the IRS if your financial circumstances allow.  All potential clients receive a free consultation!  Contact The McGuire Law Firm today!

 

Offices in Denver and Golden Colorado!  Speak with a Denver tax attorney to discuss your options and ability to settle your IRS tax debt with an offer in compromise.

What is Being Current & Compliant By Denver Tax Lawyer

If you have ever worked with the Internal Revenue Service to resolve a tax debt or tax liability, you may have heard the term “current & compliant” in Denver Tax Attorney Denver Tax Lawyerthe context of taxation from an IRS revenue officer, your tax attorney or another tax professional.  So what does it mean to be current and compliant and why is it so important?  The article below has been drafted by a Denver tax attorney at The McGuire Law Firm to explain what it means to be current and compliant, and the importance.

Current and compliant means that you, as a taxpayer, have properly filed all tax returns that would currently be due and that you have timely made all necessary tax payments in full.  Thus the exact filings and payments required to be current and in compliance will depend upon the taxpayer.  For example, a taxpayer who is self employed would be current and compliant if they have filed the most recent 1040 individual income tax return and are timely making the necessary estimated tax payment.  A business with employees, would be current and compliant if they have timely filed the most recent income tax return and have timely filed their quarterly 941 tax returns and made the necessary federal tax deposits.  Now that we have a better understanding of what it means to be current and compliant, we can look at why it is so important to be in compliance.

First, if you have tax debt to the IRS, the IRS will require that you are current and compliant to accept any type of agreement to resolve the tax debt.  For example, if you are not in compliance, the IRS will not accept an installment agreement proposal and would likely return (not accept) an offer in compromise if you had submitted an offer in an attempt to settle your tax debt.  The reasoning for this is sound.  Why would the IRS accept an agreement if you were not currently abiding by the tax laws and requirements?  Thus, to resolve a tax debt, you must be current and compliant.

Second, remaining current and compliant is mandatory to comply with the terms of your agreement.  For example, if you established an installment agreement with the IRS to resolve your tax debt, if you accrue further tax debts in the future or do not timely file a tax return, this can default your installment agreement.  Moreover, if the IRS has accepted an offer in compromise to settle your tax debt, the terms of the offer generally include that you will remain current and compliant for a period of five years after acceptance of the offer in compromise.  Thus, the accrual of a future tax debt or failure to timely file a tax return could default the terms of your offer in compromise.  If you defaulted on your offer in compromise, the remaining tax debt would be due to the IRS and you would have to resolve the liability again.

Third, if you are out of compliance by not timely filing tax returns, or timely making tax payments, you are accruing tax penalties one way or another and thus increasing your tax debt.  For example, if you are not timely filing your tax returns, you are likely accruing the failure to file penalty which can be assessed at 5% per month up to 25%.  Thus, if you owed $10,000 in tax, you could owe $12,500 if you filed your tax return 6 months passed the due date.  If you are not timely making your tax payments, the IRS can assess you the failure to pay penalty, which accrues at .5% per month and maxes out at 25%.  Thus, although the failure to pay penalty will accrue much slower, the penalty can become quite large if you fail to pay your tax debt over a period of time.  If you are not timely making your tax deposits for your 941 taxes, you can also be assessed the failure to timely deposit penalty, which is larger than the failure to pay penalty.  Thus, by not remaining current and compliant, you are accruing tax penalties and increasing your tax debt to the IRS.  Thus, the you are paying more to the IRS!

A Denver tax attorney at The McGuire Law Firm can assist you in becoming current and compliant by helping you understand your tax requirements.  Moreover, if you owe taxes to the IRS, we can help you resolve this tax debt through an installment agreement, offer in compromise (tax settlement) or other resolution option.

You can schedule a free consultation with a Denver tax attorney by contacting The McGuire Law Firm.  We offer a free consultation to all potential clients and allow payment plans on fees.  Please contact our law firm with any questions- offices in Denver and Golden Colorado.

 

 

 

Form 656 Discussed by Denver Tax Attorney

What forms do I need to complete and file with the Internal Revenue Service to submit an offer in compromise and settle my tax debt?  This a common Denver Tax Attorney IRS Offer In Compromisequestion a taxpayer may ask their tax attorney if they owe taxes to the IRS and are hoping to settle their tax debt.  The answer in short is Form 656.  The article below has been drafted by a Denver tax attorney at The McGuire Law Firm to explain Form 656 and its use in the offer in compromise process with the IRS.

Many taxpayers that owe taxes to the IRS wish to attempt to settle their tax debts through an offer in compromise.  The form that is used to propose an offer in compromise is Form 656.  Form 656 is completed by stating the taxpayer’s name, address and other contact information and social security number.  Thereafter, the taxpayer must state the types of taxes and periods for which they are requesting to settle their debt through the offer in compromise.  The taxpayer will state the reason for the offer in compromise, which is generally one of 3 options: 1) Doubt as to Liability: the taxpayer does not actually owe the tax.  2) Doubt as to Collectability: based upon the taxpayer’s income and assets they are unable to satisfy and pay the tax debt.  3) Effective Tax Administration: the taxpayer could pay the tax debt, but based upon the taxpayer’s circumstances, full payment of the taxes would create an economic hardship for the taxpayer.

In addition to the above, the taxpayer must state how they will pay for the offer in compromise and set the proposed terms for the offer in compromise.  In proposing the payment terms to make payments on the offer in compromise there are generally two options.  Option one is considered a cash offer and the taxpayer pays 20% of the offer in compromise when the offer is submitted to the IRS.  The remaining amount of the offer is then paid in five or fewer payments within a specified time of the IRS accepting the offer in compromise.  Option two is to make payments over 24 months.  Thus, the taxpayer divides the offer amount by 24 and makes the first payment when the offer is submitted and then each month the taxpayer must make a payment per the terms submitted as if the offer amount was being paid to the IRS over 24 months.  In comparing the 2 options, the cash offer may be preferred for a couple of reasons if the taxpayer can pay the amount in a shorter period of time.  First, the taxpayer is likely to pay much less out of pocket to receive a determination from the IRS.  Paying 20% down will be less for the taxpayer as soon as the taxpayer would make the 5th monthly payment if paying the offer over 24 months.  Second, the calculation of a cash offer multiplies the taxpayer’s disposable income by only 12 months whereby the long term (24 months) payment option will multiply the taxpayer’s disposable income by 24 months.  Thus, the taxpayer’s offer amount under the long term payment option may be more than if calculated under the cash payment option.  Third, the taxpayer does not have to worry about sending in the monthly payment, which can be hassle.  Further, the failure to make the monthly payment while the offer in compromise is being reviewed could lead to the IRS returning the offer.

Form 656 is submitted with the necessary financial statements.  The financial statements a taxpayer will submit with their offer will depend upon their circumstances, but would include Forms 433A OIC and/or 433B OIC.

A Denver tax attorney at The McGuire Law Firm can analyze your tax issues and financial circumstances to determine if you could settle your tax debts with the IRS through an offer in compromise.  Not every debt can be settled with an offer in compromise, and taxpayers should be weary of firms promising settlements without reviewing financial documents.  Submitting an offer in compromise that has no chance of being accepted by the IRS only wastes the taxpayer’s time and money.  Penalty and interest accrue while the offer is being reviewed and the collection statute is stopped.  Thus, submitting an offer in compromise that has no chance of being accepted is very detrimental to a taxpayer.

Schedule a free consultation with The McGuire Law Firm to speak with a tax lawyer in Denver or Golden Colorado.  Law offices in Denver and Golden- contact our tax law firm today!

Article on IRS Tax Settlement by Denver Tax Attorney

What is an IRS tax settlement?  How can I settle my IRS tax debt?  How much will I have to pay to settle my IRS tax debt?  These Denver Tax Attorneyare common questions that taxpayers will ask a tax attorney.  The article below has been drafted by a tax attorney at The McGuire Law Firm, who has settled many tax debts with the Internal Revenue Service and is experienced in working with taxpayers to resolve their IRS debts and problems.

An IRS tax settlement is when a taxpayer owes money to the Internal Revenue Service and is able to settle their tax debt for less than the amount of tax owed through an offer in compromise.  For example, a taxpayer may owe $50,000 in back taxes and through the IRS Offer in Compromise Program, they may pay $15,000 for full satisfaction of the tax debt.

A taxpayer can settle their IRS tax debt by submitting an offer in compromise to the Internal Revenue Service Offer in Compromise Unit.  An offer in compromise is prepared by completing Form 656, the necessary financial statement, which based off of the taxpayer’s circumstances would be Form 433A OIC and/or Form 433B OIC and providing all of the necessary attachments required.  Once compiled the taxpayer will mail these documents along with the necessary application fee and payments to the proper IRS Offer in Compromise Unit.  Your offer in compromise may eventually be forwarded to a different unit, but in the vast majority of cases, you will initially file your offer with the IRS at one of two offer in compromise units either Holtsville, New York or the Memphis, Tennessee Offer Unit.  Once filed, your offer will be reviewed and it will be determined whether the IRS can process your offer.

Tax attorneys are constantly asked how much they will have to pay the IRS to settle their tax debt.  The answer is always, it depends.  The reason the offer amount depends is because there is no set percentage a taxpayer can pay or offer to guarantee acceptance of their offer.  This is due to the fact that the offer amount is calculated via an equation and thus a taxpayer’s offer is amount is based upon their specific circumstances, not what Mr. Jones or Mrs. Smith may have been able to pay and settle their tax debt for.

An offer in compromise may be a viable way to settle your tax debt.  I recommend that any taxpayer consult a tax attorney or tax professional if they are considering submitting an offer in compromise.

To speak with a Denver tax attorney contact The McGuire Law Firm and schedule your free consultation at an office in Denver or Golden Colorado.

Article on Form 433A OIC by Denver Tax Attorney

What is Form 433A OIC?  This was a recent question one of our clients asked a tax attorney at The McGuire Law Firm.  The article Denver Tax Attorneybelow has been drafted in an attempt to explain what is requested on Form 433A OIC and how this form is used by the Internal Revenue Service.

Form 433A OIC is the financial statement that an individual, including a self employed individual would use when submitting an Offer in Compromise to the Internal Revenue Service.  This form, is not to be confused with Form 433A, which the Internal Revenue Service information collection statement for individuals and self employed individuals.

Form 433A OIC requests personal information from the taxpayer regarding name, address, contact information, employment information and ownership in any business.  In addition to this personal information, the form requests information regarding the taxpayer’s assets, income and expenses.  For example, the taxpayer must state information regarding their checking and savings accounts, retirement accounts, investment accounts, personal property, vehicles and other assets.  Further, the taxpayer must stated their total income, which includes: wages, interest, distributions, net business income, alimony, pensions, social security and any other source of income.  This income is then reduced by the taxpayer’s expenses to calculate the taxpayer’s disposable income.  When reviewing the taxpayer’s expenses, the IRS does establish standards for allowable expenses, known as the national standards for items such as food, clothing, housing, utilities, vehicle operation & ownership costs and out of pocket health care costs.  Other expenses the taxpayer may have may or may not be an allowed expense when calculating the taxpayer’s disposable income.  For example, generally, credit card payments which are unsecured debt would not be an allowable expense.  Further, amounts paid by the taxpayer that are in excess of the allowed standard may not be allowed by the Internal Revenue Service.  Therefore, it is not uncommon for the Internal Revenue Service to find a higher disposable income for the taxpayer than the taxpayer feels is their disposable income.

The 433A OIC assists the taxpayer in calculating their equity in assets by breaking the assets down into categories and stating the amount of the deduction a taxpayer can take for certain assets.  For example, the taxpayer may receive a 20% reduction in the fair market value of their home because the IRS takes into consideration the value of the home under a “fire sale value.”  Further, a taxpayer may be able to receive a 30% reduction in the equity of their retirement account because the IRS does take into account that the taxpayer would need to pay taxes on the account if the account were liquidated.

Thus, in short, Form 433A OIC is used to help calculate a taxpayer’s offer in compromise amount by helping the taxpayer calculate the equity in assets and disposable income, which are the figures used by the IRS to calculate a taxpayer’s offer amount.

John McGuire is a Denver tax attorney at The McGuire Law Firm and has submitted many offer in compromises for individual and business taxpayers.  Mr. McGuire is an experienced tax attorney and has significant experience in working with the IRS Offer in Compromise Unit.

Contact The McGuire Law Firm to speak with a Denver tax attorney and schedule a free consultation.

Denver Tax Lawyer Article on IRS Forms 433A and 433B

The Internal Revenue Service has many forms and schedules, so many that it can become confusing as to which form is needed for Denver Tax Lawyercertain situations.  The article below drafted by a Denver tax lawyer discusses a few popular Internal Revenue Service forms that would be used in resolving an IRS tax debt.

Form 433A: Form 433A is an individual collection statement, and can be considered an individual financial statement.  The Internal Revenue Service requires individuals to complete this statement if the individual is requesting an installment agreement, and owes over a certain amount of money or the taxpayer wishes to pay a certain amount.  This collection statement requests the necessary information the IRS uses to make a determination and provides the IRS with information that can be used to enforce collection of the tax through a bank levy, wage garnishment or seizure of assets if necessary.  Form 433A asks for information such as: name, address, employer, ownership interests in businesses, bank account information, retirement and investment account information, real property ownership and leases, car ownership and leases, personal property, wages and other income and, expenses.  Further, if an individual is self employed, pages 5 and 6 of the 433A request information regarding the businesses assets and income.

Form 433: Form 433B is a collection information statement for a business.  The IRS would require that a business complete a Form 433B if the business owes taxes and is requesting an installment agreement.  Multi member LLCs, partnerships and corporations would complete Form 433B.  Form 433B requests the name and address of the business, individual owners, ownership percentage, business bank account information, assets owned and leased by the business and business income & expenses.

Form 656: Form 656 is the form used when submitting an offer in compromise to the Internal Revenue Service.  On Form 656 you state the taxpayer’s name, tax periods you are requesting to settle, the reason for the offer in compromise, the offer in compromise amount and terms for payment of the offer in compromise amount.  Additionally, you can state your extenuating circumstances on Form 656 and where you will obtain the monies to pay the tax settlement amount.  Form 656 is submitted with your offer in compromise application fee and the initial offer in compromise payment.

A Denver tax lawyer at The McGuire Law Firm has prepared many forms for clients to resolve our clients tax debts and tax issues.  Mr. McGuire is experienced in preparing these forms and discussing the forms with our clients and the Internal Revenue Service.

Contact The McGuire Law Firm to schedule a free consultation with a Denver tax lawyer!

Tax Lawyer in Denver on Solicitations from Tax Relief Companies

You have seen their commercials on TV.  You have heard their commercials on the radio.  Maybe you have even been directly Denver Tax Attorneysolicited by them over the telephone.  I am writing about national tax relief companies, or so they call themselves tax relief companies, but the majority (vast majority) will only take your money with little work.  Many of these so called tax relief companies have been shut down by attorney general offices or other government offices.  If a company has contacted you, do some research online and you can pretty much trust the horror stories you read.  The article below drafted by a Denver tax attorney should help you understand how these companies work and why you should never (never ever!) work with them.

Fear Tactics & Bate and Switch: Most, if not all national tax relief companies use fear tactics.  These companies use salesman to call potential clients (this is unethical solicitation as well if an attorney or attorney(s) work at the firm) from a tax lien list and will tell the potential client that they are going to be levied if they do not hire the firm.  Our clients have been contacted by these firms and have been told that the company was speaking with the IRS revenue office, which is completely untrue.  The potential client is told by a salesman that their debt will be settled and/or penalties removed.  Again, all this is coming from a salesman who may not have a high school degree and certainly is not an attorney or CPA.  So the potential client is told that for a sum of money their tax debt will be settled and penalties reduced.

Who Works the File?  After the individual or business signs on with the tax relief company and makes payment, their file goes to the “associate.”  This associate may be an attorney, but often the associate is an individual that has learned how to rip people off by working at the company.  Your associate may not have a high school degree or college degree.  Thus, you are not being “represented” by or speaking with an attorney.  An attorney will sign a Power of Attorney but will not be the person you speak with and the Power of Attorney will only work on the file minimally, which of course you will likely be double-billed for.  The person you speak with has been trained how to be friendly to you and bill down your money to ask you for more and more money.

Money: Within 30-90 days of hiring the “tax relief” company, you will receive a call from your associate that your retainer needs to be updated, which means, you need to pay more money.  Likely no work and no progress has been made, but the associate will give you an excuse that you owed more than initially thought or your case is more complicated.  If you do not pay more money, they will close your case.  Hopefully, nothing has been accomplished to give you the false sense of security that this company will do much for you, because you really can get raked through the coals.

Tax Attorney: Save yourself the time and trouble.  Call a legitimate tax attorney or tax law firm.  Most offer a free consultation and can give you an honest analysis of your case.  Based on your circumstances, you may never be able to settle your tax debt or have penalties abated, but you could have spent and wasted thousands of dollars with a national tax relief firm attempting these resolutions and options.

In short, do NOT hire any “tax relief” company that is soliciting you.  If you have a question, call a local tax attorney or speak with a Denver tax attorney at The McGuire Law Firm.

 

Colorado Offer in Compromise by Denver Tax Lawyer

The majority of taxpayers know that they can settle their tax debts with the IRS through an offer in compromise.  However, many Denver Tax Lawyertaxpayers ask a Denver tax lawyer if Colorado or other states have a similar program whereby they can settle their debts.  Although, each state has different programs to resolve tax liabilities, the state of Colorado Department of Revenue does have an offer in compromise program to settle taxpayer’s debts.  The article below was written by a Denver tax lawyer regarding settling a tax debt with the Colorado Department of Revenue.

Although, the Colorado Department of Revenue will settle a tax debt with an offer in compromise, the taxpayer must firm have settled their tax debt with the IRS through a federal offer in compromise.  This can create a situation whereby the taxpayer has submitted an offer to the IRS, but has yet to receive a response, but also must take action with their Colorado state debt to prevent enforcement.  Generally, a tax lawyer will work with the CO Department of Revenue to establish a minimal installment agreement until a determination is received on the federal offer in compromise.

Once a taxpayer has received acceptance of their offer from the IRS, they can submit their offer to the Colorado Department of Revenue.  In submitting the offer, the taxpayer must include:

–          Form 433A that was submitted to the IRS

–          Form 656 that was submitted to the IRS

–          Acceptance letter from the IRS verifying the federal offer in compromise was accepted

–          Verification the federal offer was paid

–          Colorado Department of Revenue Financial Statement

–          Colorado Offer in Compromise Checklist

–          Amount you are proposing to settle your Colorado tax debt

–          IRS Account Transcripts for each period of debt you are requesting to settle with the Department of Revenue

–          If you are represented by a tax attorney, a copy of the Power of Attorney should be included as well

–          You can also include payment for your offer if you choose

After all of your documents have been compiled, submit the documents to the Colorado Department of Revenue.  The address for the Department of Revenue should be 1375 Sherman Street, Denver, Colorado.  Typically, the Department of Revenue will respond within 30-60 days after you have submitted your offer in compromise.  If your offer is accepted by the Department of Revenue, and you made payment when submitting the offer, you may be all done.

A Denver tax lawyer at The McGuire Law Firm can help you settle your tax debts with the Colorado Department of Revenue.  If you owe taxes to the Colorado Department of Revenue we would welcome the opportunity to discuss your options to resolve your tax debt.

You can reach a Denver tax attorney and schedule your free consultation by contacting The McGuire Law Firm.

 

Denver Tax Attorney Describes Offer in Compromise Process With IRS

Previously a Denver tax attorney at The McGuire Law Firm has written articles regarding the process of preparing and submitting an offer in compromise to Denver Tax Attorney Denver Tax Lawyerthe IRS.  However, clients will often as a tax attorney, “what is the offer process once the offer is submitted to the IRS?”  We hope the article below helps answer this question.

Upon receipt of the offer, the IRS Offer in Compromise unit initially reviews the offer to make sure the offer can be processed.  The offer unit will look to make sure all forms and attachments have been completed correctly and are included, proper payment of the offer in compromise application fee and initial offer payment are enclosed and the offer unit will check to make sure the taxpayer is current and compliant with their tax obligations.  Current and compliant refers to the taxpayer having filed all current returns that are due and making any necessary tax payments or deposits that would be due.  The failure to be in compliance at this stage of the offer process or any stage can lead to the offer unit or the offer examiner returning the offer in compromise.  When an offer in compromise is returned, the taxpayer does not have the ability to appeal the decision.  The distinction between the offer being returned versus the offer being rejected is important.  If an offer is rejected the taxpayer can appeal the determination, whereas if the offer is returned, the taxpayer has no appeal rights.  After the offer unit deems that the offer can be processed, the offer will be forwarded to an offer examiner.  The offer examiner may be located in a different unit or department than where you forwarded the offer, but you will receive notice from the unit.

The offer examiner will examine the forms and attachments and can conduct other forms of investigation such as through secretary of state websites, clerk and county records or any other means available to the examiner, including the internet.  Our Denver tax attorneys have actually seen an offer examiner investigate certain issues regarding a business taxpayer by visiting the taxpayer website.  Further, the examiner may request additional information and would do so by issuing a written request to the taxpayer.  If the additional documents are not provided to the examiner, the offer can be rejected.  After the examiner has concluded their investigation, they will issue their determination. The determination may be to accept the offer exactly as proposed or they may “reject” the offer amount, but be willing to accept a larger amount.  Moreover, the examiner could reject the offer stating that based upon the taxpayer’s reasonable collection potential, the entire tax debt can be paid and thus the taxpayer is not an offer in compromise candidate.

If your offer is accepted, you pay the offer amount as proposed or could request the terms be amended at such time.  If the examiner has requested a larger amount, you can provide additional information in an attempt to refute the increase.  If you are unable to come to terms with the examiner, you can appeal the rejection of the offer in compromise to the IRS appeals office.

If you would like to discuss an offer in compromise in more detail please contact a Denver tax attorney at our office.  Our tax attorneys have a lot of experience in negotiating with offer examiners and we are proud of the outcomes we are able to obtain for our clients.

A tax attorney The McGuire Law Firm can assist you with an offer in compromise and other tax issues.  Contact our law firm to schedule your free consultation.  720-833-7705 or John@jmtaxlaw.com

 

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